The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy (India)

Review no 162 Book 5 of my #20booksofsummer The God of Small Things is one of those books that everyone reading this will have heard of, but I don’t suppose everyone will have read. It won the Booker Prize in 1997 and rapidly became the biggest-selling work of Indian fiction by a non-expat writer. Arundhati …

Priestdaddy by Patricia Lockwood (USA): Review no 161

#20booksofsummer, book 4 Priestdaddy is an acclaimed memoir by US writer Patricia Lockwood, who is currently on the Women’s Prize shortlist for her first novel, No-one Is Talking About This, and whose tweets come imbued with the aura of legend. This, her first book, was published in 2017, and has a particularly random cover in …

Review no 141: A Golden Age by Tahmima Anam (Bangladesh)

FAR EAST, SOUTH ASIA AND AUSTRALASIA First published in 2007, Tahmima Anam’s intimate civil war tale A Golden Age won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize for the Best First Book and was shortlisted for the Costa First Novel Award. The edition I read was published in 2012 as part of the Canongate ‘the Canons‘ list, which …

Review no 126: Three Apples Fell from the Sky by Narine Abgaryan (Armenia)

NORTH AFRICA, MIDDLE EAST, CENTRAL ASIA AND THE SOUTH CAUCASUS Translated from the Russian by Lisa C. Hayden First published in Russian in 2015, Three Apples fell from the Sky is a whimsical and fable-like book by the Armenian writer Narine Abgaryan. It features a huge cast of characters living in the isolated mountain village …

Review no 101: Family Lexicon by Natalia Ginzburg (Italy)

Translated by Jenny McPhee EUROPE “Even though the story is real, I think one should read it as if it were a novel, and therefore not demand of it any more or less than a novel can offer … memory is ephemeral, and … books based on reality are often only faint glimpses and fragments …